(612) 871-2445

Email Us

10 Convenient Twin Cities Locations

Open Monday - Friday • Closed Weekends

How To Include Loved Ones In The Conversation Who Have Hearing Loss

Conversations preserve our sanity. Imagine being unable to express yourself or hear what someone has to say to you. Here are some tips on how to involve a loved one in a conversation when they suffer from hearing loss.

We take conversations for granted and often speak with our backs turned toward the listener. We also tend to get distracted by our own thoughts when we are being spoken to.

 

Conversations preserve our sanity. Imagine being unable to express yourself or hear what someone has to say to you. The importance of dialogue cannot be ignored, especially when it comes to interacting with a loved one bound by hearing loss.

 

Hearing loss can be hard on those suffering from it as well as on those near and dear to such people. Here are some tips on how to involve a loved one in a conversation when they suffer from hearing loss.

 

  • Always face the person and look at them when you speak. This way, they will know when they are being spoken to.
  • If the person has some degree of hearing – with or without a hearing aid - speak distinctly and clearly.
  • Make sure that you do not try speaking to the person from another room.
  • Talk in a bright or well-lit room so the person can read your lips. Conversely, do not stand against a bright light or window since the glare would make it hard for them to read your lips.
  • Get the person’s attention by first calling their name or gently tapping them on the shoulder before starting a conversation.
  • Listening is an essential part of any conversation, so give the person a chance to express their views. Avoid interrupting them in the midst of their conveyance. Once they finish saying what they have to say, you may speak.
  • If you use sign language to communicate, ensure you wait for the person to finishing before you start.
  • Ensure there is minimal background noise when speaking to the person.
  • Speak on topics that are of interest to the person.
  • Read the person’s facial expressions. If they seem puzzled, it could mean that they have not heard you well enough, which implies that you may need to repeat yourself.

 

The bottom line here is to remember that engaging with a loved one who faces hearing impairments is healthy and appreciative. It makes the person feel less lonely and isolated.

 

Make it a point to have regular conversations with them. Involve them in day-to-day activities. All this will certainly go a long way in assuring them that they're still a part of the family.

Meet our Audiologists

Proudly offering leading brands

View our complete product range